SDGPP in Brazil

Against a backdrop of increased political turmoil, and income disparity, Brazil has reduced extreme poverty by half and has shown significant economic growth over the past two decades.

$100K Pledged

Mobilization

Six of the biggest Brazilian foundations and associations, namely, Instituto C&A, Fundação Itaú Social, Banco Itaú, Fundação Roberto Marinho, Rede Globo, Fundação Banco do Brasil and Instituto Sabin have joined their efforts to roll-out SDG Philanthropy Platform in Brazil and advance SDG Agenda.

180 Philanthropists & Social Investors Engaged

Partnering

To date, 180 philanthropists and social investors have been engaged in a dialogue on SDGs, development priorities, greater engagement of national actors, etc., through a series of important workshops and meetings.

4 SDGs Prioritized

Pathways

As a result of SDG system thinking workshop, SDG 4, SDG 5, SDG 10 and SDG 16 have been identified as accelerators for generating a catalytic transformation in the Brazilian society.

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Progress and SDG Priorities

What's on the SDG agenda for Brazil? How has its development agenda evolved in response to past achievements? Click on each SDG to find out!

The Sustainable Development Goals

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), otherwise known as the Global Goals, are a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity.

These 17 Goals build on the successes of the Millennium Development Goals, while including new areas such as climate change, economic inequality, innovation, sustainable consumption, peace and justice, among other priorities. The goals are interconnected – often the key to success on one will involve tackling issues more commonly associated with another.

The SDGs work in the spirit of partnership and pragmatism to make the right choices now to improve life, in a sustainable way, for future generations. They provide clear guidelines and targets for all countries to adopt in accordance with their own priorities and the environmental challenges of the world at large. The SDGs are an inclusive agenda. They tackle the root causes of poverty and unite us together to make a positive change for both people and planet.

The Sustainable Development Goals

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), otherwise known as the Global Goals, are a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity.

These 17 Goals build on the successes of the Millennium Development Goals, while including new areas such as climate change, economic inequality, innovation, sustainable consumption, peace and justice, among other priorities. The goals are interconnected – often the key to success on one will involve tackling issues more commonly associated with another.

The SDGs work in the spirit of partnership and pragmatism to make the right choices now to improve life, in a sustainable way, for future generations. They provide clear guidelines and targets for all countries to adopt in accordance with their own priorities and the environmental challenges of the world at large. The SDGs are an inclusive agenda. They tackle the root causes of poverty and unite us together to make a positive change for both people and planet.

End poverty in all its forms everywhere

Progress:

  • 26 million people were lifted out of poverty from 2002 to 2014;
  • The share of population living in absolute poverty fell from 7.6% in 2004 to 2.8% in 2014

Challenges:

  • GDP has slowed from 4.5% in 2006-10 to 2.1% over 2011 - 14;
  • Inflation remains high, ending 2015 at 10.5%;
  • Poverty persists among vulnerable populations, especially Northeast rural poor, indigenous, agro-extractivists and Afrodescents.

SDG Priorities: 

  • Forthcoming

End hunger, achieve food security, improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

Progress:

  • Forthcoming

Challenges:

  • High infant mortality rate of indigenous children mostly due to diarrhoea and malnutrition (43.3% per 1,000 live births

SDG Priorities:

  • Allocating US$ 784.58 million in order to expand the purchase of family farming production and effectively improve economic conditions

Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

Progress:

  • Forthcoming

Challenges:

  • Infant mortality rate is 63.9 per 100,000 cases (vs target 35);
  • Prevalence of diarrhea and malnutrition among indigenous infants;
  • High rate of anemia among indigenous women (32,7%) due to inadequate management of indigenous lands, lack of access to seeds and health services.

SDG Priorities:

  • Expanding the Family Health Strategy (ESF)

  • Making the country self-sufficient in the supply of physicians and replacing 4,000 physicians from partner countries by Brazilians in 3 years

Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

Progress:

  • Net enrollment rate of 95.6% in primary education achieved in 2005;
  • Increased proportion of people with an upper secondary qualification 

Challenges:

  • Only 36% of 3-year-old and 57% of 4-year-old children were enrolled in pre-primary education vs. average of 67% and 85% for OECD countries respectively;
  • The enrollment rate of 15-19 year-old people reached 77% in 2011 but is still well below the average 84% for OECD countries

SDG Priorities:

  • Promote equal access to quality education for all groups of the Brazilian society.

Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Progress: 

  • Forthcoming

Challenges:

  • Social markers related to class, race and ethnicity are sources of inequalities faced by afro-descent, indigenous and rural women;
  • Murders of afro-descent women increased by 54% over the past decade;
  • Brazilian women are still paid lower wages and face more obstacles to entering and remaining in the labour market.

SDG Priorities:

  • Reducing violence against women in the country;
  • Providing assistance to victims of sexual violence by public security professionals and health professionals of the Unified health System;
  • Fighting human trafficking and sexual exploitation.

Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation

Progress:

  • Increased proportion of households with toilets connected to the sanitation network  (from 33% in 2004 to 43% in 2013) among the poorest 40% of the population

Challenges:

  • Uneven distribution of water throughout the country territory;
  • 24% of infant mortality cases in Duque de Caxias, a city in south-eastern Brazil, are caused by insanitary conditions of the Bay waters;
  • 65 % of all hospitalizations in Brazil occur due to water-transmitted diseases 

SDG Priorities:

  • Developing environmental technologies to ensure access to potable water in isolated regions;
  • Improving the management of water resources to increase the quantity and quality of water;
  • Constructing  domestic sewage treatment systems, and improving other soil and water conservation practices.

Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

Progress:

  • The Brazilian energy matrix remains one of the cleanest in the world: in 2014, almost 40% of the domestic energy supply derived from the use of renewable sources

Challenges:

  • Increased electric power transmission and distribution losses, (over 15 % of electricity output)

SDG Priorities:

  • Cutting per capita emissions by 72% to achieve the committed emission goals for 2030;
  • Increasing the installed wind energy capacity capacity by 300% in the next 6 years;
  • Promoting energy efficiency, clean and renewable technologies, and environmentally sustainable practices.

Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work

Progress: 

  • 12.9 million companies employing 40 mln people (85% of SMEs – 52% of formal job positions)

Challenges:

  • GDP growth has slowed from 4.5% in 2006-10 to 2.1% over 2011 - 14;
  • High inflation rates (10.8% in 2015);
  • SMEs account only for 27% of GDP;
  • Low access to training and technology for SMEs

SDG Priorities:

  • Forthcoming

Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation and foster innovation

Progress:

  • Forthcoming

Challenges:

  • Brazil ranks 107th out of 144 countries in level of infrastructure development: quality of roads - 120th place, railroads - 103rd place,  ports - 131st place, air transport - 123rd place (WEF, 2014) 

SDG Priorities:

  • Forthcoming

Reduce inequality within and among countries

Progress:

  • Inequality was significantly reduced as the Gini coefficient has fallen by 6%;

Challenges:

  • Poverty persists among most vulnerable populations: Northeast rural poor, indigenous, agro-extractivist, Afro-descents;
  • Unequal access to political and economic resources, rights and public services;
  • High homicide rates against women, in particular Afro-descent;
  • Inadequate management of indigenous land, lack of access to seeds and health services among women;
  • Indigenous ethnicities (guardian of protected areas) threatened by farmers, loggers and illegal mining;
  • Majority of persons in the prison systems are young (54.8%) and Afro-descent (60.8%)

SDG Priorities:

  • Reducing inequality
  • Ensuring universal access to justice

Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Progress:

  • Forthcoming

Challenges:

  • Concentration of poverty in urban areas;
  • Increasing number of irregular occupations and lack of public services (80% - urban population)

SDG Priorities:

  • Forthcoming

Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Progress:

  • 285 Brazilian Municipalities, accounting for 33% of the national population, joined the Sustainable Cities Program.

Challenges:

  • Forthcoming

SDG Priorities:

  • Forthcoming

Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

Progress:

  • GHG emission reduced by 41% as compared to 2005 levels

Challenges:

  • Continuous increase of natural disaster impacts (droughts, floods, landslides), mostly affecting Afro-descent poor populations living in favelas

SDG Priorities:

  • Reduction of GHG emission additionally by 37% in 2025 and 43% in 2030 (against 2005 level)

Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

Progress: 

  • Using satellite Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) to fight illegal fishing on the Brazilian coast 

Challenges:

  • More than 800 tons of solid waste, rife with fecal and drug-resistant bacteria from homes and hospitals emptied into Guanabara Bay each day

SDG Priorities: 

  • Expansion of the marine and coastal protected area system from the current 1.5% to 5% of the Brazilian marine territory (equivalent to 17.5 million hectares)

Life on Land

Peace, Justice & Strong Institutions

Partnership for the Goals

Navigating the Landscape

What you need to know about doing philanthropy in Brazil. 

Legal Structures

Associations

Public Foundation

Private Foundations

The Development Agenda and SDGs

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The SDG Process in Brazil

1

Planning

2

Implementation

3

Monitoring