Despite growing inequalities, and remnants of war and conflict Colombia claims a diversified economy and favorable growth prospects, bolstered by a new peacebuilding process. 

17 Foundations Mobilized

Mobilization

The SDG Philanthropy Platform has partnered with UNDP Colombia, and the Association of Corporate and Family Foundations (AFE), to engage 17 Colombian foundations in a regional development plan in Antioquia aligned with the SDGs.

Advancing the Peace Agenda

Partnering

In partnership with the Association of Corporate and Family Foundations (AFE), the SDG Philanthropy Platform developed a Philanthropy and Peace Report which provides concrete recommendations for local and international philanthropic organizations to support Colombia's transition towards peace.

1500 Projects Mapped

Pathways

In partnership with the Association of Corporate and Family Foundations (AFE), 1500 projects have been mapped to improve the management, tracking and data of SDG implementation.

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Progress and SDG Priorities

What's on the SDG agenda for Colombia? How has its development agenda evolved in response to past achievements?

End poverty in all its forms everywhere

Progress:

  • Poverty and extreme poverty reduction targets were met one year before the deadline.
  • Multidimensional poverty rate is 20,2% in 2015, down from 30,4% in 2010, representing over 4 million of Colombians.

Challenges:

  • Unequal progress among rural/urban areas as well as among various population groups
  • Poverty rates reach 60% in Cordoba, Choco and Cauca, rural and coastal areas far from urban centers
  • Poverty rate among the 6 million internally displaced persons is more than three times the national average
  • Afro-Colombian households have 20% lower per-capita income than non-Afro-Colombian households
  • Drop in oil prices, which represents 50% of foreign trade revenues, could affect government capacity to finance peace-building and poverty reduction policies

SDG priorities:

  • Addressing regional and ethnic disparities 
  • Addressing the structural cases behind female poverty
  • Addressing the specific needs of indigenous and Afro-Colombian populations in the Pacific and Caribbean regions

End poverty in all its forms everywhere

Progress:

  • Poverty and extreme poverty reduction targets were met one year before the deadline.
  • Multidimensional poverty rate is 20,2% in 2015, down from 30,4% in 2010, representing over 4 million of Colombians.

Challenges:

  • Unequal progress among rural/urban areas as well as among various population groups
  • Poverty rates reach 60% in Cordoba, Choco and Cauca, rural and coastal areas far from urban centers
  • Poverty rate among the 6 million internally displaced persons is more than three times the national average
  • Afro-Colombian households have 20% lower per-capita income than non-Afro-Colombian households
  • Drop in oil prices, which represents 50% of foreign trade revenues, could affect government capacity to finance peace-building and poverty reduction policies

SDG priorities:

  • Addressing regional and ethnic disparities 
  • Addressing the structural cases behind female poverty
  • Addressing the specific needs of indigenous and Afro-Colombian populations in the Pacific and Caribbean regions

End hunger, achieve food security, improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

Progress:

  • Reduced overall poverty levels 

Challenges:

  • Unequal progress among rural/urban areas as well as among various groups of population

SDG priorities:

  • Addressing regional and ethnic disparities 
  • Focusing on agriculture’s critical role
  • Ensuring access to basic rights such as health and nutrition

Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

Progress:

  • Infant mortality rate halted at 17.25 deaths per thousand births (2013), fulfilling the MDG goal before the deadline
  • High rate of health coverage of total population (97,58% in 2015)
  • Good progress on maternal health (45% reduction in maternal mortality between 2001 and 2013)
  • By the end of 2013, 99% of the recorded births were attended by health professionals
  • Prenatal check-ups increased from 52% in 2000 to 80% in 2013

Challenges:

  • Inadequate vaccine coverage for infants
  • Increased number of teenage pregnancies
  • 18% of maternal deaths are among women between 10 and 19 years

SDG Priorities:

  • Addressing regional and ethnic disparities
  • Reducing child mortality
  • Ensuring access to quality basic social services
  • Reducing teenage pregnancy 
  • Improving sexual and reproductive health services

Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

Progress:

  • 100% coverage rate in universal primary education

Challenges:

  • Insufficient coverage in secondary education 

SDG priorities:

  • Improving secondary education coverage
  • Addressing disruptions in rural areas caused by inadequate infrastructure, natural disasters and insecurity
  • Addressing gender and ethnic disparities.

Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Progress:

  • Slightly stronger female political representation (2010-2014: 17.2% and 2014-2018: 23%)
  • Women, on average, have slightly more years of schooling (10.1 years) in comparison to men (9.5 years)

Challenges:

  • Women face an unemployment rate twice that of men and earn wages 21% lower, despite their higher educational levels

SDG Priorities:

  • Improving labour-market and addressing salary gaps 
  • Mainstreaming gender considerations (gender lens) into policies, budgets, normative and legal frameworks
  • Eradicating of all forms of violence against women (gender-based violence)

Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation

Progress:

  • Increased access to improved water sources
  • Improved water access in urban areas as reported by 97.4% of the urban population

Challenges:

  • Decline in quality of water sanitation facilities due to increase in informal settlements, cost of sanitation infrastructure, low investment returns for private sector
  • Deforestation adversely affecting catchment areas and thus is a growing concern

SDG Priorities:

  • Forthcoming

Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

Progress:

  • Predominant use of hydropower energy

Challenges:

  • Growing extractive sector

SDG priorities:

  • Exploring other options for affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy sources

Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work

Progress:

  • Macro-economic stability
  • Low inflation
  • Strong economic growth

Challenges:

  • Drop in oil prices, which represents 50% of foreign trade revenues, could affect government capacity to finance peacebuilding and poverty reduction policies
  • Economic growth is dependent on extractive industries
  • Disparities across population groups and geographical areas
  • Youth and rural unemployment
  • Informal employment

SDG priorities:

  • Exploring options for innovative, inclusive and sustainable productive strategies
  • Addressing regional and ethnic disparities
  • Addressing youth unemployment and informal employment

Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation and foster innovation

SDG priorities:

  • Rehabilitating community infrastructure in municipalities most affected by the armed conflict
  • Implementing innovative ICT-based solutions for the effective provision of state services

Reduce inequality within and among countries

Challenges:

  • Disparities across population groups and geographical areas
  • Under-representation of women, ethnic minorities and youth in decision-making processes

SDG priorities:

  • Addressing regional and ethnic disparities
  • Increasing the voice of rural women, young leaders and ethnic minorities

 

Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Challenges:

  • Vulnerability to natural hazards and climate change
  • Lack of gender-sensitive risk-prevention strategies

SDG priorities:

  • Developing and introducing gender-sensitive risk-prevention strategies

Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Challenges:

  • Growth of mining and energy sector increases the pressure on natural resources and traditional forms of rural production that depend on ecosystem services

SDG priorities:

  • Strengthening of livelihoods among the most vulnerable populations, particularly women, Afro-Colombians, and indigenous people, who live in places with the greatest biodiversity

Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

Progress:

  • Decline in deforestation rate
  • Reliance on hydropower has kept carbon dioxide emissions low

 

Challenges:

  • Economic growth, dependent on extractive industries, creates environmental impacts, and disregards risks associated with climate change  
  • Steady rise in the number of cars in use in the years ahead as households grow wealthier will result in higher emissions and more air pollution

SDG priorities:

  • Reducing the environmental impact pf certain economic sectors, including the extractive industry, agriculture and cattle ranching 
  • Identifying carbon reduction potential across multiple production sectors
  • Implementing carbon reduction strategies

Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

Challenges:

  • Water pollution as a result of growing extractive sector  

SDG priorities:

  • Promoting gender-sensitive conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity
  • Developing alternatives for using biodiversity and ecosystem services based on best international practices in order to capitalize on environmental endowments of Colombia

 

Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems

Progress:

  • Decline in deforestation rate

Challenges:

  • Soil pollution as a result of growing extractive sector

SDG priorities:

  • Addressing climate change
  • Promoting gender-sensitive conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity
  • Developing alternatives for using biodiversity and ecosystem services based on best international practices in order to capitalize on environmental endowments of Colombia

Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels

Progress:

  • A breakthrough in peace negotiations between the Government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia
  • Decline in violence associated with the armed conflicts since the start of peace negotiations
  • Decentralization process is underway

 

Challenges:

  • Colombia remains the second most violent country in Latin America
  • Social conflicts over land property generated as a result of economic growth, dependent on extractive industries, urban development, cattle ranching, and land restitution
  • Lack of cultural and legal institutions for non-violent dispute settlements and conflict resolutions
  • Citizens of many regions face obstacles to benefiting from inclusive governance, rule of law and access to high-quality state services due to limited institutional capacity of the Government, lack of citizens’ capacity to claim their legal and human rights as well as lack of effective mechanisms to tackle corruption

SDG priorities:

  • Securing law, order and citizens’ access to “peace dividends” in the form of civil, political, social, economic and cultural rights
  • Reducing inequalities and social and environmental conflicts
  • Improving the balance of power among the courts, the presidency and the Congress to increase confidence in democracy
  • Empowering citizens to participate in formulating and monitoring of subnational development plans
  • Enhancing transparency of state institutions through sustainable accountability processes
  • Enacting community-based conflict resolution mechanisms to build resilient communities capable of reconciliation and peaceful transformation of social and environmental conflicts

 

Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalise the global partnership for sustainable development

SDG priorities:

  • Becoming a member of OECD and a model for peacebuilding and social innovation
  • Positioning Colombia as a strategic ally to receive and channel South-South and triangular cooperation  
  • Fostering multi-stakeholder collaboration with UN, private sector, civil society and philanthropy to advance SDG agenda

Philanthropy in Colombia

Colombia has a strong third sector with a multiplicity of social actors, from grant-making foundations to community-based organizations working on a broad spectrum of social, environmental and economic issues.

Although there is no official data as to how many foundations are in Colombia, it is estimated that around 1,000 foundations currently operate in the country-some for over 100 years.The culture of giving is considered strong, especially by family and corporate foundations. 

The most relevant social actors in Colombia are categorized as follows:

  • Non-governmental organizations: To date there are over 7,000 NGOs operating in Colombia. Most of these are focused on promoting education and democracy, monitoring the rule of law, and peace building. There are several guilds in the country that bring together the NGOs present in specific territory, the most important being the Colombian Confederation of NGOs (CCONG).
  • Foundations: They are classified under two approaches: the source of their resources and the way they make their social investments. The sub-types of foundations are the following:
  • Corporate Foundations: Funds are directly related to a corporation/enterprise.
  • Family Foundations: Funds derive from members of a single family (COF).
  • Independent Foundations: Those who provide the funds do not possess the control of the foundation; hence its management and governance are independent of the funders.
  • Community Foundations: Grant making public charities with the aim of improving the quality of life of a specific geographic area.
  • Community-based organizations: Self-organized group of people intending to defend common interests through a non-profit organization formed by local volunteers.

Navigating the Landscape

What you need to know about doing philanthropy in Colombia

Legal structures

NGOs Colombia

Societies Colombia

The Development Agenda and SDGs

Philanthropy must keep within global, national and subnational levels of governance and accountability that influence development priorities and structures.

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The SDG Process in Colombia

How far along is Colombia in formally integrating the SDGs into its planning, implementation and monitoring processes

1

Planning

2

Implementation

3

Monitoring