Ghana is a thriving multi-party democracy which has demonstrated impressive economic growth and has a booming natural resource sector. Despite this, the country’s expansion into a lower middle-income economy is yet to translate into productive and decent employment as well as the reduction of income inequality.

25 Influential Leaders Connected

Connections

A group of 25 leaders from philanthropy, civil society, government, bilateral agencies and UN has formed the Ghana Advisory Council to enable greater philanthropic investments in Ghana's development plans.

3 Collaborative Pathways Defined

Collaboration

3 pathways have been developed to accelerate access to safe and affordable water in Ghana: finding a demand-driven business model for water delivery, setting water quality standards, and identifying solutions to provide water to vulnerable households.

3 Innovative Projects Funded 

Partnering

3 innovators, Saha Global, TREND and CONIWAS, were awarded with up to $40,000 to fund work on the collaborative pathways to safe water in Ghana.

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Progress and SDG Priorities

What's on the SDG agenda for Ghana? How has its development agenda evolved in response to past achievements?

End poverty in all its forms everywhere

Progress:

  • Significant decrease in extreme poverty

Challenges:

  • High poverty rates in rural areas and 3 northern regions
  • High income inequality between rural and urban areas

SDG Priorities:

  • Addressing regional disparities and income inequality 

End poverty in all its forms everywhere

Progress:

  • Significant decrease in extreme poverty

Challenges:

  • High poverty rates in rural areas and 3 northern regions
  • High income inequality between rural and urban areas

SDG Priorities:

  • Addressing regional disparities and income inequality 

End hunger, achieve food security, improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

Progress:

  • Substantial decline in the prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight children, with MDG targets being surpassed

Challenges: 

  • Higher level of stunting among children residing in rural areas, of mothers with no education and poor households (vs urban areas, educated mothers and wealthy households)

SDG priorities:

  • Addressing regional disparities and income inequality

Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being

Progress:

  • Improved mortality rate for children under 5 years
  • HIV and AIDS prevalence decreased to 1.3 percent by 2013

Challenges:

  • Infant mortality rate (53) short of the target of 22 deaths per 1,000 live births
  • Maternal mortality rate (144) was short of global target of 54 per 100,000 live births
  • Access to antiretroviral drugs is not yet universal; it has improved for females overall but declined for pregnant women

SDG priorities:

  • Malaria remains a public health concern

Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education

Progress:

  • MDG Primary education gross enrollment and completion targets exceeded
  • Consistent improvement in youth literacy

Challenges:

  • Primary education net enrollment
  • Youth literacy rates are higher among males than females
  • Inadequate infrastructure and basic tools, equipment and materials for teaching and learning, which affect quality
  • Quality of education remains a concern at all levels, particularly in public basic schools

SDG priorities:

  • Addressing gender disparities in education
  • Ensuring adequate quality of education
  • Developing adequate infrastructure and basic tools, equipment and materials

Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Progress:  

  • Gender parity in primary school enrollment

Challenges:

  • Low female enrollment in secondary and tertiary education
  • No progress in achieving gender equality in productive employment
  • Low female participation in decision making

SDG priorities:

  • Tackling gender-based inequalities in terms of access to assets, employment opportunities, political processes and representation

Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation

Progress:

  • Significant gains have been made in access to improved water sources (78.6% of total population in 2013)

Challenges:

  • Significant disparity between rural and urban population in access to improved water sources
  • Inadequate financial resources to carry out and maintain major water projects
  • Fast rate of urbanization which comes with increasing demand for water for domestic, industrial and commercial consumption
  • Most households are without basic sanitation, particularly in rural areas

SDG priorities:

  • Increasing the rate of population with access to safe drinking water and improved sanitation facilities
  • Strengthening enabling environment for improved Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) behavior
  • Fostering behavior change on WASH

Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

Challenges:
  • Carbon intensive energy supply and inequitable access to energy

SDG Priorities:

  • Increasing renewable energy production
  • Promoting investments in renewable energy
  • Improving energy efficiency

Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work

Progress:

  • High GDP growth propelled by commercial oil production that pushed the country from lower income to middle income status in 2010
  • An increased proportion of people in productive employment and increasing number of new job-market entrants, particularly the youth, contributed to high employment-to-population ratio (75.6%)
  • Improved wages of many groups of workers due to shifts from low-paying jobs to better paying jobs

 

Challenges:

  • Youth unemployment  
  • Source of growth tends to be biased in favor of extractive sector and capital-intensive sectors which do not have direct poverty reducing effect while agriculture sector keeps crawling
  • Continuing reliance on rain-fed agriculture with low levels of mechanization and limited adoption of modern agricultural techniques is a major constraint on productivity growth in agriculture
  • Ghana’s impressive growth has been driven by the low labor-absorption sectors of mining and oil, with labor-intensive manufacturing and agriculture lagging behind
  • The working poverty rate remains high in 3 northern regions
  • Low level of education of workforce restricts access to highly skilled and better remunerated jobs

SDG Priorities:

  • Ensuring the achievement of full and productive employment and decent work for all, including women and young people

Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation and foster innovation

Progress:

  • Mobile and cellular phone penetration has outstripped both Africa and world rates while internet subscription is almost at par with the average for Africa

Challenges:

  • Poverty endemic areas constrained by basic infrastructure that link their economic activity to urban market centers

SDG Priorities:

  • Forthcoming

Reduce inequality within and among countries

Challenges:

  • Increasing inequality

SDG Priorities:

  • Reducing regional disparities and aligning funding to local and regional governments based on both performance and disparities

Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Challenges:

  • A significant deficit in secure housing persists, along with the presence of urban slums
  • Inadequate long-term finance for the housing sector

SDG Priorities:

  • Focusing on more sustainable urbanization and migration policies and initiatives
  • Increasing community resilience to climate change

Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Challenges:

  • Food crop farmers often face the problem of marketing and price instability regarding their farm produce
  • Continuing reliance on rain-fed agriculture with low levels of mechanization and limited adoption of modern agricultural techniques is a major constraint on productivity growth in agriculture

SDG priorities:

  • Forthcoming

Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

SDG priorities:

  • Development and implementation of national climate change plans and programmes to reduce carbon emissions

Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

SDG Priorities:

  • Forthcoming

Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems

Progress:

  • Establishment of 168,910 hectares of forest plantation, mainly within degraded forest reserves, under the National Forest Plantation Development Programme 2002-2012

Challenges:

  • Depletion of forest cover continues at an alarming rate
  • Excessive logging, unsustainable agricultural practices, bushfires, cutting of fuelwood, mining and quarrying

SDG Priorities:

  • forthcoming

Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels

SDG priorities:

  • Strengthening universal participation in decision-making and decentralization of governance processes
  • Development of mechanisms for conflict prevention, management and resolution
  • Capacity development of national Human Rights institutions
  • Ensuring access to justice for the poor and disadvantaged

 

Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

Progress:

  • Net ODA inflows are increasing in nominal terms

Challenges:

  • Ratio of ODA to GDP has dropped since 2009

SDG priorities:

  • Fostering multi-stakeholder collaboration among UN, government, private sector, civil society and philanthropy

Philanthropy in Ghana

The desire to promote the welfare of others or initiatives for public good has a deep history in Ghana. The informal traditions of mutuality, and communal, collective responsibility is part of the fabric of the society.

Philanthropy in Ghana is practiced in a variety of forms including giving money, time, resources, and support. 

Philanthropic engagement in Ghana varies widely and is not often formalized – creating both opportunities and challenges. In recent years, Ghana’s economic growth has rapidly expanded the middle class. There has recently been an increase in the number of entrepreneurs and high net-worth individuals who give back to society in diverse ways, but successful philanthropy requires carefully tailored stakeholder coordination. Local foundations are gradually growing to complement the development efforts of national and local governments. Corporate philanthropy seem the most visible form of philanthropy expressed in the form of corporate social responsibility. Majority of the global foundations operating in Ghana do not have physical offices; they operate through implementing partner NGOs and INGOs. Ghana has a vibrant NGO/civil society sector which reflects the country’s deepening democracy, culture of tolerance and active citizenship.

Navigating the Landscape

What you need to know about doing philanthropy in Ghana

Legal structures

NGOs Ghana

The SDG Process in Ghana

How far along is Ghana in formally integrating the SDGs into its planning, implementation and monitoring processes?

1

Planning

2

Implementation

3

Monitoring